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12 Author of Word of Mouth Marketing Visits Referral Week

This post is a special Make a Referral Week guest post featuring education on the subject of referrals and word of mouth marketing and making 1000 referrals to 1000 small businesses – check it out at Make a Referral Week 2010

Marketing podcast with Andy Sernovitz (Click to listen, right click and Save As to download – subscribe now via iTunes

Andy SernovitzAndy Sernovitz, founder of the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) and author of Word of Mouth Marketing chatted with me for this special episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast.

    We covered a wide range of topics related to Word of Mouth Marketing such as:

  • The difference between referrals and word of mouth
  • How word of mouth happens
  • How to create word of mouth campaigns
  • Simple examples of small businesses word of mouth success

8 The Anatomy of Buzz Revisited

Anatomy of BuzzBuzz is all around us and as hot a marketing topic as there is going, but for a recent episode of the Duct Tape Marketing podcast I caught up with Emanuel Rosen author of the national bestseller The Anatomy of Buzz (Doubleday, 2000) and “The Anatomy of Buzz Revisited (Doubleday, 2009).

Rosen’s first book was a favorite of mine before it was cool to acknowledge the power of word of mouth buzz and most everything that’s been written since can cite him as an influence.

Prior to writing these books, he was VP Marketing at Niles Software where he was responsible for launching and marketing the company’s flagship product EndNote which spread to a large extent by word of mouth.

Rosen uses a great deal of research to support his positions and one of my favorite little factoids taken from his research is the finding that 30% of negative buzz comes from people who have never owned or used a product or service. Well, that certainly helps make the case for why you better focus on making some good noise.

    In this podcast we discuss:

  • Just what the heck “Buzz” marketing is
  • How to find the “Buzz” to your business
  • How to balance and integrate “Buzz”
  • How to measure word-of-mouth marketing
  • And the ethics of word-of-mouth marketing

iLinc Web and Video ConferencingThis episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by iLinc – Web and Video Conferencing that’s easy to use, affordable and powerful enough to make your online meetings really come alive.

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2 Talking Word of Mouth with Andy Sernovitz

This is a special podcast as part of Make a Referral Week 2009

Andy SernovitzAndy Sernovitz, author of Word of Mouth Marketing: How Smart Companies Get People Talking. chatted with me for this special episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast.

Andy shares a wealth of information on his blog DamnIWish and is offering Make a Referral Week participants 25% off his one day Word of Mouth Crash Course held monthly in Chicago (Use this discount code: THANKSDUCTTAPE)

  • We covered a wide range of topics related to Word of Mouth Marketing such as:
  • The difference between referrals and word of mouth
  • How word of mouth happens
  • How to create word of mouth campaigns
  • Simple examples of small businesses word of mouth success

iLinc Web and Video ConferencingThis episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by iLinc – Web and Video Conferencing that’s easy to use, affordable and powerful enough to make your online meetings really come alive.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

11 How to Demonstrate Word of Mouth

Word of Mouth Manual IISo how do you demonstrate what a book is about? How do you create word of mouth as an experiment for how to create word of mouth?

If you’re Dave Balter, creator of BuzzAgent, you write a book called The Word of Mouth Manual: Volume II. But, what’s really buzzworthy about that?

First off, the book’s a fun, irreverent, well-written, explanation of the art of word of mouth packed with examples that will be new to most readers.

Then you make the purpose of the book seem to be some sort of self-actualized illustration of the words on the pages. In fact, the point of this book might not be that you read it as much as it is that you talk about it.

Read it you can and should though and free of charge – Download the complete Word of Mouth Manual

The Word of Mouth Manual: Volume II is split into three enlightening, funny sections, all working together to prove that WOM is one of the most powerful marketing mediums on the planet.

And now the laboratory part

In addition to downloading and reading the book (check out the other 20 or so blogs playing along here) you can buy the book, but know this

  • Only a few thousand are available for purchase
  • Each comes with an original piece of Seth B. Minkin art
  • It’s specially packaged, designed to be lightweight and simple to hold

4 Two minutes with Scott Cook

Scott CookI was able to grab a couple minutes with Scott Cook, founder of Intuit, at the Conversational Marketing Summit today.

Cook is the very approachable and thoughtful leader of an organization cited by many as one of the better examples of how a company actually grows through word of mouth.

The idea that marketing today consists of having conversations with customers is one that is still meeting some resistance in the corporate and small business worlds. It occurs to me that the companies that have embraced it, are good at it and are growing comfortably inside this new way of looking at marketing, are the ones that already have an internal culture that is based in conversations rather than directives. These are the organizations that make it ok for their employees to point out and fix what’s wrong, to experiment and to take risks.

Conversational marketing relies heavily on authenticity and transparency – you can’t give those to your clients if you don’t own them in your business.

Cook talks about something he calls the “volunteer workforce” and offers some clues to the success of Intuit’s word of mouth model. Listen below.


MP3 File

2 Everyone is talking about word of mouse but . . .

. . . few are actually doing much about it.

Mark Jarvis Dell CMOWord of mouth marketing and its online namesake – “word of mouse” (I stole that from Mark Jarvis, CMO of Dell, but I don’t know where he stole it from.) is all the rage in big company marketing departments and the corner table staff meeting at Starbuck’s alike.

And yet, I recently read that less than 5% of the Fortune 500 companies employ a blog or similar online new media tool and only 3% of the Inc 500. So, where’s the disconnect.

I sat down with Mark Jarvis, Dell’s CMO, and discussed online marketing, new media and community building in marketing as a whole and at Dell for a special “field version” of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast.

Jarvis talked about a “Generation Gap” that is epidemic in most large companies and the leading cause of a real lack of understanding and employing word of mouth at companies large and small.

See, my daughters – heading squarely into the prime marketing demographic – wouldn’t know what to do with a Yellow Pages directory if you handed one to them, don’t watch much TV (never watch network TV), and don’t really listen to radio – it’s more like they snack on it for about 25 seconds a song.

So what Jarvis is talking about and what Dell in my opinion is moving towards is not some trendy new cutting edge way of marketing it’s the future, it’s here now and it’s a game of survival. If you don’t figure this out, if you don’t tap the power of the Internet in smart, relevant, engaging and community building ways you will become last year’s phone book.

Dell is making the right noise, but noise only goes so far – during the conference where I met up with Jarvis an audiance participant asked if this new way of marketing was how Dell intended to market away some of its lingering customer service issues and to that Jarvis replied, “You don’t market your way out of customer service issues, you fix the issues.” We shall see.

Check out SB360, Idea Storm and Studio Dell – they keep getting better. (Disclaimer, I contribute some content to each, although I’m not sure that has anything to do with them getting better.)

15 A Branded Out of Office Note

Most of the time branding comes down to paying attention to the littlest details and putting them into the littlest things – like your voice mail message, fax cover sheet and even your automated out of office email reply.

Andy Sernovitz, author of Word of Mouth Marketing gets this.

In true Andy fashion, here’s his vacation reply that I received recently. Instead of the typical fact based message this made me stop, laugh and think of Andy’s brand. It’s always the little stuff!

Without Andy’s permission (he’s camping somewhere) – I share it with you. Hope he’s ok with that, if asked just tell him you sent him an email and this is the response you got.

I’m off on vacation from Aug. 13-24.
No, really, I am. For real.

I’ll be camping somewhere, with minimal access to phone and email. If it’s an emergency or urgent new business, please send an email and I’ll call you from a Starbucks.

Actually, they recently installed a Starbucks in the trunk of my car, because having a store every 80 yards just wasn’t enough.

Other options:
1. Take a vacation too.
2. Call my office #. It forwards to my cell. I’ll check messages on occasion.
3. Order a shipment from http://www.corkysbbq.com/
4. Procrastinate by writing a silly and long out of office message.
5. Find me a new assistant, hire them, then have them call me. (Seriously, I’m hiring a new team, so send resumes.)
6. Read the funniest thing ever written: http://www.candyboots.com/wwcards.html
7. Buy this album: http://www.amazon.com/Fillmore-East-Frank-Zappa-Mothers/dp/B0000009S9/

Cheers,

Andy

14 An Automated Testimonial Machine

Most marketers know they can benefit from customer testimonials, but the work involving acquiring these glowing marketing messages can get in the way. I’ve been using a handy tool to generate and play audio messages on web sites for some time now, but I’ve recently started using this same service to automatically generate testimonials.

Here’s how it works. I send a client a link. (or post it to a web page.) When the client clicks on the link they are taken to a page that asks them to write a brief testimonial, then they are moved to a screen that gives them a toll free phone number and asks them to call and recorded a voice testimonial. The script even allows them to upload their picture to be used in a testimonial posted to a web page.

Once a client participates in the system, the act of placing their testimonial, including the audio clip, is fairly painless. Testimonials are very powerful and become even more so with images and audio to back them up.

Click this link to see how the automated testimonial machine works.

1 And Now a Word from the Word of Mouth Podcast

Andy Sernovitz, CEO of the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) stopped by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast to talk about his book, apply named book – Word of Mouth Marketing: How Smart Companies Get People Talking.

Andy’s book points out the fact that while word of mouth marketing has been around a long time, new marketing tools allow, as Ben and Jackie call them “Citizen Marketers,” to fan and spread the flame of both good and bad press. New media tools are driving some would be marketers to devise campaigns to create favorable word of mouth marketing. While I think a good publicity stunt or other tactic to get people talking can be an effective tool, real word of mouth marketing is usually one of the most honest forms of marketing you can practice.

It’s not necessarily easy to create the buzz of word of mouth, but Sernovitz does a great job of uncovering the winning formula employed by some great companies

.

The Fully Armed Citizen Marketers

Ben McConnell, co-author of Citizen Marketers and Creating Customer Evangelists, stopped by the Duct Tape Marketing podcast recently to talk about new kind of marketer – the Citizen Marketer.

The book sheds light on some very interesting case studies of customers, fans, angry mobs and just plain happy or annoyed folk, taking matters into their own hands and using some of the latest social media and Internet based tools to get the attention of a company, spread their love for a product or express their their loathing.

Citizen marketers have always existed I suppose, only now, they are armed with some very powerful, viral tools that can allow them to have a significant impact, for good or bad, on a brand or product.

The book is a great reminder that good companies, doing good things, can tap this new kind of marketer for more good. And, bad companies, doing bad things, have few places to hide from the armed citizen marketer.