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2 Like It or Not You're Being Compared to TED

Marketing Podcast with Carmine Gallo

2014 marks the 30th anniversary of the phenomenon knows simply as TED. At this point in time an entire generation has grown up feasting on TED Talks.

John Jantsch TEDxKC

In the world of communication TED Talks are the gold standard by which not only formal presentations are gauged, but most forms of communication are gauged.

Within the thousands of successful TED Talks there runs a somewhat common thread, or formula perhaps, that has transformed the way presenters present, leaders lead and teachers teach.

Mastering, or at least acknowledging, this art form has become required study for marketers, business leaders and communicators alike.

My guest for this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is Carmine Gallo, author of Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds.

Gallo has made a career out of studying TED Talks and in his book he breaks down the elements of the most successful talks. The book is filled with example after example of real talks and, along with the TED repository, acts as a bit of a master’s class in the art of great presenting.

If you’re not tapping the TED library to get better at speaking you’re missing out on a tremendous free training resource.

Gallo starts our interview by suggesting, as I have in the title of this post, that in business today your communication skills are likely being compared to the TED standard.

Gallo’s book breaks down the very specific elements you need to master, but in the end, there’s one skill that will take you farther than any other and that’s the ability to communicate with stories.

I’ve always contended that the best leaders, the best marketers, are the best storytellers and at its very core the art of the TED Talk is framed in the art of storytelling.

28 Status Tagging Your Facebook Updates

As Facebook continues to grow and provide more and more search functionality so does the need to think strategically about optimizing some of your status updates.

About six months ago Facebook introduced status tagging, a feature that allows you to tag and link to pages and people that you like from your updates. When writing an update you simply start with @ and the person you want to tag and Facebook will add a link in the update to that person and (depending on privacy settings) post your update to their wall and notify them they’ve been tagged. (The tagged person can always undo the tag)

Careful use of this practice can lead to increased exposure of your updates and pages. Somewhat recently Facebook also started building “community pages” – a way to build pages on topics and help bring people together around common interests. While most of these pages exist purely from people saying they like something on their profile, some have begun to get some real niche followers and traction.

It’s beginning to make sense for people on Facebook to start to take the time to research topics related to their business, interests and industry and start “liking” a number of popular community pages with an eye on status tagging these pages in your updates.

Here’s an example. Yesterday I wrote about public speaking and mentioned the popular TED Talks and Toastmasters groups in my post. I went to Facebook to share the link for the blog post and tagged the public speaking, TED talks, and Toastmasters International community pages. This action placed my update on all three of these community pages and exposed it to another 30,000 or so potential readers. (You must be a fan of these pages to use the tagging feature and there may be a lag in the time you like them and they show up in tagging.)

Because TED is so popular (over 500,000 fans) I also took the time to post to the TED page wall. Understand that this was content that was very relevant to this audience and not just a post to grab eyeballs. Strategic optimization of your status updates can take a little more time and thought, but the additional exposure through sharing quality content and updates is becoming well worth the time.

I wonder how this might become a play for local businesses routinely tagging community pages for their city?

20 How To Become a More Effective Speaker

TEDSpeaking, or, at the very least, effectively presenting an idea, whether to two or two thousand, is an essential business skill. I would argue that marketers should have one or two core presentations that they make routinely as a way to share their companies’ unique point of view or story. Small business owners should think of presenting information in online and offline seminar formats as an important lead generation and conversion tactic.

Many people struggle with speaking in front of an audience and the only real cure for this is to get up and do it, realize no one will suffer permanently from it, and then get up and do it again. There are, however, three bits of advice that I would give to anyone that desires to become a more effective speaker. For me, effective only means getting your point across in a way that inspires the listener to do what you want them to do.

Share the love – one of the most important elements an effective speaker brings to an audience is passion. This can be passion for helping people get something valuable from hearing the lesson or advice presented or passion for the subject itself. You can’t fake passion, but when you have it, your message often comes through more clearly regardless of the polish of your speaking presence.

If you’re naturally passionate about your subject or the purpose of your information, then just don’t hold back, let people be attracted to that passion. If, however, your position requires you to present information that may be useful, but doesn’t exactly capture your imagination, then your job is to inject something you are passionate about. Let’s say you are talking about network security, but what you really love is World of Warcraft, music, or baseball. I believe you will be a much more compelling speaker when you find a way to weave topics you are passionate about into your presentations.

Become a TEDhead – If you’re not familiar with TED, then I am thrilled to be the one to introduce it to you. TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. It has grown to be a worldwide phenomenon and one of the best places for you to learn how to be a better speaker.

TED speakers are chosen because they are fascinating and have passion for a big idea. The format challenges them to present that idea within 18 minutes and most use very little in the way of slides or media. Every TED Talk is recorded and housed on the site. Make this your classroom and you will have access to a tremendous collection of speakers that will inspire and teach you how to be better speaker. Watch everything they do. (Start with Dan Pink on the Science of Motivation)

Shoot Your Free Throws – Legend has it that Larry Bird, the great NBA star, shot 100 free throws every day, even after he became a superstar. He also led the league in successful free throw shooting year after year. In order to be a better speaker you’ve got to practice. You may choose to spend a lot of time in front of mirror going over your presentation, but I suggest you get in some pickup games pretty quickly too.

Hunt down a Toastmaster’s Chapter in your area and start forcing yourself to present and receive critical review from a peer group. Seek out opportunities to present your ideas wherever you can. Speaking to the knitting club monthly lunch may not get you in front of the audience you ultimately desire, but it will get you live feedback and help you get better. Another thing about practicing in front of an audience is that it almost always leads to other speaking opportunities. Don’t let weeks slip by without rehearsing and presenting live, keep refining your ideas and approach by listening to your audience.

7 Weekend Favs August Twenty-nine

mountainsI’ve added a weekend post routine that I hope you enjoy. Each weekend I write a post that features 3-4 things I read during the week that I found interesting. Generally speaking it won’t involve much analysis and may range widely in topic. (Flickr image included here is also fav image of the week)

Enjoy!

Good stuff I ran across this week:

Image credit: Philippe sergent

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