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podcast

Build Your Brand and Acquire Links Through Podcast Guesting

I want to talk to you about podcasting, but in a way that may be different than what you typically hear about the topic. I’m not going to discuss production logistics or anything like that. Instead, I want to discuss how to use them to build your brand and acquire links.

There’s no denying that interest in podcasting has increased over time, especially within the last 5-6 years. I think this is for a couple of reasons:

  • Content has become the air that drives so many channels
  • It’s portable and allows for multi-tasking nature of it

The combination of the two has allowed the popularity of this medium to skyrocket, both from listening and production standpoints.

While I think producing a podcast is a great idea and can provide many benefits for your business, there are also a plethora of opportunities that are there in podcasting for any business owner, namely through being a guest on another person’s podcast. Let’s dive in.

Guest interviews

Putting yourself out there as a guest on podcasts (as opposed to traditional PR with radio and TV) is one of the best things you can do for your business these days, but let me be clear, in order to be successful with it,  you must put yourself out there and pitch yourself on an ongoing basis, and truly build this as a channel for your marketing efforts.

A podcast interview is not only content, it’s great quality content. It’s a tremendous way for you to build expertise, authority, and branding for you and your business. When people hear your voice, it adds a deeper level to building trust, and the more a person trusts you, the more likely they’ll be to buy from you.

SEO and the benefits of podcasting

My friend, Phil Singleton, is one of the most knowledgeable people on SEO that I know, and he recently stated (over this past weekend, in fact) that of all the time he has spent on SEO, podcasting may be the best SEO tactic to give you the biggest bang for your buck. Being a podcast guest provides the following benefits:

  • Gives you access to an engaged audience
  • The host does the majority of the work
  • You have virtually no preparation (especially in comparison to guest blog posts)
  • High production value will make the content more shareable
  • There will likely be show notes that will drive links back to your website
  • Reviews can help build authority and credibility
  • There is a ton of repurposing potential with the content

At the end of the day, SEO really comes down to three main things:

  • Keywords – You must know what keywords your ideal client is searching for
  • Content – You must build those keywords into your content on a consistent basis
  • Links – That content must be seen and shared by other people by acquiring links from other sites to link to that content. From that, Google surmises that it’s good content.

If you focus on those few things over time, you will show up, and likely rank highly, in search engine rankings. What this means, is that a guest appearance on a podcast is your content on steroids. You get high-quality content and awareness to the podcaster’s audience (podcasts get shared more than blog posts).

Guest blog posts are a lot of work and time-consuming. Even if a podcast doesn’t have a huge following, it will likely still have more engagement than blog posts and have the ability to get more shares than regular blog posts and you will get links back to whatever it is that you’re promoting.

To make this even better, a lot of podcasters, including myself, are also creating transcripts along with their podcast episodes to have the written word content go along with the spoken content. In many cases, if you appear on a podcast, and they don’t transcribe it, many podcasters will let you transcribe it and repurpose it for additional content on your site; again, which will help to boost your SEO.

How to get on shows

Remember, this is a consistent process, not just something you do every once in a while, so it’s important that you allocate time and attention to this. Below are a few ways you can approach getting on podcasts.

Google search

Google is great at showing podcasts. Start by searching with an industry you’re interested in and google “[industry] podcast” and see what appears. Simple enough, right?

iTunes

iTunes not only categorizes podcasts, they include related searches like Google as well.

Amazon

If you click on an author link, Amazon will show related authors, which can help expand your search.

From your research, build a spreadsheet of hosts you want to reach out to. Most podcasts have some form of contact information or a form asking people to pitch themselves as a guest.

Once your spreadsheet is filled out, one of the things I’d spend time on is to think of your objective for being on a show. Make the podcast host understand the value they’ll get by interviewing you.

From a content and link objective perspective, don’t worry about how big the show is or the size of the audience. Focus on the links and content and make sure they align with your objective.

In almost all cases, you need to go out and pitch people. I can’t emphasize this enough, if you listen and subscribe to their show and know the host’s listeners, what they talk about, and how they deliver value, you’ll do a much better job of showing how you’ll benefit their listeners in your pitch.

These days, podcasters are looking for guests to have one-sheets that include your bio, why you’re a good fit, what you have to offer, places you’ve appeared, what others have said about you, and so on. If a podcaster is trying to decide between you and another guest, the one-pager can go a long way. The more professional you’ll look, the better your odds are of getting chosen for the show.

How to be a great guest

Your work isn’t done once you book the podcast. In order to be a great guest and get the most value out of this exposure, you really need to prep for it.

Subscribe and listen

If you want to be on a show, subscribe to it, or at least listen to it and really educate yourself on the host’s style and type of questions he/she may ask.

Don’t sell

The purpose of the interview is to educate or entertain the host’s audience. You may have the opportunity at the end of the episode to say where people can find you and so on, but nothing will turn an interview sour faster than selling.

Answer questions succinctly

A minute to 90 seconds is often too long for a response. Prepping will help you be clear and concise in your delivery.

Sound quality

Nothing is more frustrating than listening to a podcast with poor sound quality. Before you hop on the interview, confirm you have a solid internet connection or cell reception, and take the call in a quiet space to try to eliminate any extra background noise.

Show appreciation for the opportunity

Once you’re on the call, remember to thank the host for having you on the show and express your appreciation. Once the show is complete, be sure to leave a review for the podcast on iTunes.

How to promote your interview

After the show, most podcast hosts will send you a link to promote the show, and may even send you proposed copy for social media posts. Sharing and promoting your appearance makes a lot of sense. It helps spread the word and it’s good content that people may want to share. Look for multiple ways to promote it to your network.

After everything is said and done, ask your host for a review and use it in your marketing to boost your authority. If you own a local business, have them do the review through Google. Think of this as an opportunity to produce content and get amazing links and put your SEO on steroids.

Introducing a new podcast booking service called – Podcast Bookers

Want to streamline your efforts to get booked on podcasts? I’ve started a new service just for that. Podcast Bookers will help you create your one sheet, will show you how to pitch yourself, and will help book you as a guest on podcasts. For more information, click here.

Need more tips on search engine optimization? Check out our entire Guide to SEO.

podcasting marketing tactic

10 Reasons Podcast Guesting is the #1 Killer Content Marketing Tactic of All Time

Whoa. This is a bold statement, but hear me out.

I have been earning a living from search engine optimization for over 12 years and I’ve tried every tactic at one time or another.

Ever since Google started dropping algorithmic bombs around 2011 (think Panda, Penguin, and so on), SEO industry behavior has changed. Most SEO services have moved back onshore and “real” SEO is now an integrated part of holistic marketing.

That means legit SEO companies have become web designers, social media strategists, reputation managers and yes, content marketers.

In order to succeed, we as marketers and business owners must build our own audiences, strive for niche authority and become influencers. As such, I just recently started getting booked on podcasts and have been stunned by the benefits.

So Much Value in So Little Time

Pound-for-pound, I have never seen a tactic that has produced so many wins, with so little effort:

  1. Unbelievable access to a highly engaged audience. In one 20 to 40-minute interview, with little preparation, you can access hundreds to thousands of highly targeted listeners. If this top ten list stopped here at #1, this by itself is all the reason you need to consider a podcast guesting campaign.
  2. Easier than guest blogging. Guest blog posting is one of the most popular forms of content marketing. But it’s a grind because it takes a lot of time to write really good educational content (like I am doing right now on a Saturday morning), and there is a lot of spam and outreach noise that website owners have to deal with. Sure there are a lot of professional blog outreach services you can outsource to, but they can be pricey.   The beauty of podcast guesting is that you get to be published on the host’s blog with valuable organic links via a show notes page (example).
  3. Real personal connections. One of the big surprises to me was the feeling of friendship that develops during an interview. The fact that two people (the guest and the host) have each other’s undivided attention for an involved discussion creates a bond that can turn into collaboration. For example, in my own experience, hosts have offered to make personal introductions to other influential podcast hosts. Huge. Huge. Benefit.
  4. High content production value. Most established podcasts, and even newer ones, put a lot of effort into production, including professional sound, editing, creating custom web graphics, and writing a custom show notes page that includes guest bio information, key takeaways, and resource and contact links.
  5. Cross-amplification on steroids. When a podcast goes lives, there’s this cool feeling of a mini-launch that results in a highly shareable piece of content. Hosts are happy to have interesting guests, and guests are excited to be interviewed. The nature of the way podcasts are produced and distributed (audio, web page and often video) makes them much more shareable than typical blog posts – resulting in more likes, shares, tweets, backlinks and traffic.
  6. Free long-form blog posts. I have found that some podcasts hosts will provide full interview transcripts on their show notes pages, but most don’t. When they don’t plan to publish the transcripts, I have asked hosts if I can transcribe the show at my own expense and post on my own site as a blog post. No one has ever said no! This is a great way to get really good, unique content on your site with no effort (and very little expense if you use a transcription service).
  7. Increased dwell time. Dwell time has been a hot SEO topic for the last year or so. While Google does not directly acknowledge website dwell time as a ranking factor, most SEO experts believe there is a direct correlation between a page’s rankings and the amount of time users spend on the page. Podcasts, when embedded on a website, are unique because listeners are much more likely to listen for longer periods. A two-minute video seems really long because it commands all of your senses. But a podcast of 20 minutes goes by really fast because you can be doing other things while listening. Thus, embedding a podcast audio file on your site (as part of #6 above) may help your SEO efforts.
  8. New trust badges and bragging rights. As you are interviewed on more podcasts, your reach in terms of the caliber of shows begins to snowball. In the 30 or so I have done this year, each one is better than the last. For example, next month I will be on John Lee Dumas’ highly popular podcast Entrepreneur on Fire – and plan to use this as an “as seen on” eye candy for my websites.
  9. Online reviews. One of the things I’ve done, that most guests don’t, is send a request for review feedback right after the show. This allows me to not only get reviews on important review sites, but I also repurpose these into testimonials for my websites. Again, just the review equity from this alone make podcast guesting worth it.
  10. Oh yeah, Sales! You can get lots of leads by being a guest on podcasts, but you can’t sell during the interview – this is a big no-no. Your job as a guest expert is to share your story and educate. If listeners like and learn from what you say, you will get leads by nature of being an informative guest. I have probably had at least $100,000 in new business (annualized) for my agency in a few short months, and it has definitely boosted book sales.

Putting My Money Where My Podcasting Mouth Is

Podcast guesting is so valuable, in fact, that I partnered with John Jantsch to create a podcast booking service called Podcast Bookers. We did this for a couple reasons:

  • John’s been podcasting since 2005 and gets pitched daily by folks that want to be on his popular podcast. He knows what makes for a compelling pitch to hosts and where the gaps are with respect to podcast booking service providers.
  • After interviewing podcast booking services and using a few of them, I saw how the service is executed in a one-dimensional way. Yet, I see so many more SEO benefits to podcast booking that no one is taking advantage of, so I just had to start my own service with a brand new approach.

Whether you use our specialized service, another podcasting booking service, or even your own direct outreach, I promise that if you are prepared, have an angle and a story to tell, you and your clients can use podcast guesting to skyrocket your influence and authority.


About the Author

phil singleton

Phil Singleton is a Duct Tape Marketing Certified Consultant and co-author of the Amazon best-seller SEO for Growth: The Ultimate Guide for Marketers, Web Designers & Entrepreneurs.  He owns and operates a boutique web design firm, Kansas City Web Design, and markets and sells Internet marketing services under the brand Kansas City SEO.

How to Get a Meeting With Anyone

Marketing Podcast with Stu Heinecke

HTGAMWA

Getting a meeting with the right prospects, influencers and mentors can make all the difference in the world when it comes to your business.

But, you’ve probably also discovered that grabbing the attention of the right individuals doesn’t happen just because you picked up the phone and dialed them up.

My guest for this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is Stu Heinecke, a Wall St. Journal cartoonist, marketer, podcaster and author of How to Get a Meeting with Anyone. We discuss being a cartoonist, podcasting and marketing in general.

Questions I ask Stu:

  • What’s a cartoonist doing writing a book about sales?
  • How can you be persistent on a cold call without being a pest?
  • What do people do wrong on sales calls?

What you’ll learn if you give a listen:

  • How Stu’s career as a cartoonist has helped him connect with just about anyone
  • How to use the concept of contact marketing to advance your gain new leads
  • The difference between contact marketing and cold calling

Find out more about Stu and get a free preview his book How to Get a Meeting with Anyone at http://www.stuheinecke.com/

 

 

Find More Ideal Customers with Buyer Personas

20110220Revella0213_400x400Marketing Podcast with Adele Revella

You know how much I love to talk about strategy -well, the reason is that strategy before tactics is how the game is played – I mean, if you want to win.

But, what exactly is strategy?

It’s many things I suppose, which one of the reasons it’s so vexing for most people.

Know this, however, you can’t get your marketing strategy right unless you understand who it is you’re aiming at.

I don’t simply mean who your target marketing is, that’s an element, but you can’t stop there.

You have to understand them – what drives them, what scares them, how they make decisions, and even how they use your product or service – and one of the only ways to get to this level of understanding is to ask!

My guest for this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is Adele Revella, CEO of the Buyer Persona Institute and author of Buyer Personas: How to Gain Insight Into Your Customers’ Expectations, Align Your Marketing Strategies and Win More Business. We discuss buyer personas, how to identify your ideal customers, and how to get your ideal customers to tell you how to earn their business.

Questions I ask Adele:

  • Are buyer personas really as powerful as your book suggests?
  • Can you build buyer personas for your ideal customers yourself?
  • How can you reach customers earlier in the buying process?

What You’ll Learn if You Give a Listen:

  • Why you must conduct interviews in order to build accurate buyer personas
  • How to make the information gained in a persona interview actionable
  • The many ways you can use buyer personas to improve your marketing

To find out more about Adele, the Buyer Persona Institute and her book, Buyer Personas: How to Gain Insight Into Your Customers’ Expectations, Align Your Marketing Strategies and Win More Business, visit http://www.buyerpersona.com/

 

3 What is the Future of Business Growth?

via Twitter

via Twitter

Marketing Podcast with Amanda Holmes

Seven or eight years ago I had a guest on this show named Chet Holmes. Holmes was fresh on the high of a best-selling book, The Ulitmate Sales Machine, a book that still sits at the top of many lists today.

Several years later after building a multi-million dollar business around his brand he passed away.

My guest on this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is Amanda Holmes, CEO of Chet Holmes international. She took over her father’s company at the age of 24 after his passing. We talk about her road to being CEO and the future of business growth.

In this episode we talk about some highly personal things as my journey follows that of Chet’s to some degree and several of my daughters work for me currently. I think you’ll enjoy our conversation.

Questions I ask Amanda:

  • What is it like to take over a successful business at such a young age?
  • How is Chet Holmes International different today?
  • How did you learn how to run a company?

What you’ll learn if you give a listen:

  • Why it is so important to do what you love.
  • Why you must focus on self-care as well as business care.
  • How business owners can seek answers from alternative sources.

 

 

Classic Podcast: How to Differentiate Your Business

Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 5.08.02 PM

Marketing Podcast with Bernadette Jiwa

For this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast, we’re turning the clock back to 2013 and one of the most popular, and one of my favorite interviews of all time. We’re revisiting my chat with Bernadette Jiwa, and we talk about her then new book Make Your Idea Matter. Since speaking to her, she has published three more books including The Fortune Cookie Principle, Difference and her latest, Marketing: A Love Story. You can visit her very popular marketing blog, The Story of Telling here: http://thestoryoftelling.com/

Jiwa is someone you should be following if you’re not. She created her brand by doing one thing very well – creating content people love.

She’s the leading voice these days on differentiating your business and someone that has proven you can build a large and loyal following through content.

Questions I ask Bernadette:

  • How writing a book based on a blog is different than writing a “Big Idea” book
  • How do you define branding in a small business setting?
  • How can a single moment play into the definition of your brand?

What you’ll learn if you give a listen:

  • How to differentiate your business and not be boring
  • How to decide on what to write
  • How your customers are involved in the creation of your brand 

This week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing podcast is MarketingProfs. Do you have the write stuff? Unleash your inner writer by downloading the latest MarketingProfs marketing writing kit for free! Visit: http://mprofs.com/ducttape

1 Highest Duty: The Search For What Really Matters

highest honor

Marketing Podcast with Capt. Sully Sullenberger

My guest on this week’s podcast is former airline pilot, speaker, entrepreneur and author of Highest Duty: My Search for What Really MattersCaptain Chesley “Sulley” Sullenberger. You probably know Sully best from the “Miracle in the Hudson,” where he completed the emergency landing of US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson river in New York City on January 15, 2009.

When his PR agency pitched me on the idea of having Sullenberger on the show I must admit that I was intrigued by the opportunity to hear the story of the flight and landing on the Hudson, but what really drew me to the interview was the opportunity to talk about how a life altering moment became such a total career-altering moment.

It’s worth a listen just to hear Sullenberger relate the now very practiced account of the happenings that cold January morning, but it’s equally as interesting to note that he had apparently become a bit disenchanted with what was going on all around him in his chosen industry.

When an opportunity to change everything presented itself he grabbed it and became it. Sullenberger certainly was handed the chance to remake his career in stunning fashion (Hello, Good Morning America is on the line) but he also went to work on remaking himself in order to excel at his new career.

He knew he had to become a better writer, speaker and storyteller and worked diligently on honing these new skills.

Questions I ask Sully:

  • How has your life changed since the event?
  • What qualities of leadership are important in starting a new business?
  • How do you go about acquiring new skills needed for a new career?

What you’ll learn if you give a listen:

  • What it was like to be in the cockpit during the “Miracle of the Hudson”
  • How a foundation or system can help you handle difficult situations
  • How to think about risk when starting a business

This episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Hostgator, where you’ll get 24 hour live support via chat, phone or email, 1-click WordPress installs, easy-to-use website builder, design services, marketing services like SEO and PPC, and for my listeners: a 30% Discount. Go to www.Hostgator.com/promo/ducttape

2 The Future of SEO

Marketing podcast with TopRank’s Lee Odden

photo credit: Simon & His Camera via photopin cc

photo credit: Simon & His Camera via photopin cc

Does it makes sense for companies to invest in SEO as an independent activity? Can you influence search without content and social?

Those are some of the questions I asked Lee Odden, author of Optimize: How to Attract and Engage More Customers by Integrating SEO, Social Media, and Content Marketing and founder of TopRank Online Marketing for this week’s episode of the Duct Tape Marketing Podcast.

I think it’s easy to say SEO is dead. Certainly it’s not practiced the way it once was but does it still have a place as a stand alone marketing practice.

The practical matter is that when you’re in a competitive environment it’s not enough to put up good content. There’s still a need for content and digital assets to align with keywords and that takes intention. Social media participation and authority are increasingly important so as Odden shares in this interview – “you’ve got to be doing it all.”

Content marketing is perhaps the future of SEO right now, but it’s not just content – it’s content marketing. The implication being that the content has a purpose and a specific intent.

Odden’s recent blog post titled – The Truth About Content Marketing and SEO makes this distinction very clear.

13 How and Why I Podcast

I have produced a weekly podcast for about five years now. It started out as one of my content creation tactics but quickly became an important way to gain access to leading authors and marketing professionals. In fact, I’ve often referred to it as my secret weapon.

I’ve developed a pretty stable following and the show generally ranks in the top twenty on iTunes for the marketing and management category, but I would do it even no one listened because of the doors it has opened.

Podcasting isn’t the red hot trendy topic these days, but it’s still a very solid tool to put in your content bag. Every now and then I get asked what tools I use to produce my show and so I thought I would write a post to spell my routine out.

My shows are all interviews done via a phone line

  • To capture the calls I use SkypeIn line so guests can call from a landline but I capture the call on Skype (Obviously Skype to Skype calls work well too)
  • To record I use a Skype plugin called Call Recorder (Pamela on PC) – this plugin has feature that also allows me to split the tracks so my guest and I are can be edited separately.
  • For my sound I use a Sennheiser USB headset – a little pricey but always a great place to spend your money.
  • To edit the show I use Garage Band on a Mac – you can also use Audacity on a PC
  • I purchased intro music track from iStockphoto
  • To host the show I use Libsyn – I don’t use all of the features from this tool but the hosting and streaming bandwidth is inexpensive
  • I use this WordPress blog to publish my shows so I use Feedburner to make the category feed podcast and iTunes friendly
  • Occasionally I’ll transcribe an episode using Casting Words

You can listen to the show by subscribing the feed in iTunes or a variety of other free services such as Google Listen (Use this RSS feed) or you can buy the Duct Tape Marketing iPhone app. (iTunes link – Cost is $2.99) or Android app and listen to the show as well as about ten past shows on your phone.

10 Chaos

Exploiting Chaos with the Trendhunter

Marketing podcast with Jeremy Gutsche (Click to listen, right click and Save As to download – subscribe now via iTunes

exploiting chaosFor this episode of the Duct Tape Marketing podcast I talked about Exploiting Chaos with TrendHunter founder Jeremy Gutsche. TrendHunter is billed as the world’s largest network for trend spotting and innovation and the site is a terribly entertaining and informative place to spend some time.

Jeremy’s book – Exploiting Chaos – 150 ways to spark innovation during times of change – is a fun and engaging read. The book is filled with bold statements, images and tidbits along with stories that illustrate each point. I found it to be one of the more thoughtful books on the topic of innovation that I’ve read in a long time.

Pick any short chapter and you are certain to be inspired by the creative and sometimes risky thinking.

In our session we talked about:

  • About trend spotting
  • About new book: Exploiting Chaos
  • Expanding on: Exploiting economic recession/turmoil
  • Expanding on: Culture is more important than strategy
  • Expanding on: Failing through innovation
  • Expanding on: Hire freaks
  • Uncovering future trends
  • Future global trends