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Week Two Roundup from the Duct Tape Selling Blog

As part of the lead up to the launch of my new book Duct Tape Selling I asked some of the organizations behind the resources I note in the book to contribute guest blog posts. The result of that request has produced some truly awesome content. For the next few weeks I’ll be rounding up the best of the best and amplifying it here. Enjoy!

How to Use Twitter Search to Generate Leads

How to generate leads from twitter searchSales teams are increasingly using social listening to generate leads and find business opportunities. While every social channel plays its role, Twitter is often the best vehicle for this.

Known as the ‘thought’ channel, users are much more likely to speak openly about a problem on Twitter than they would on Linkedin or Facebook. This provides a direct line into the needs, concerns and loyalties of a prospect which, when used right, can be a great foundation for connecting with them.

From the folks at Twilert Read the rest . . .

3 Things You Can Do to Maximize Your Moments In Front of an Audience

How you perform in the fleeting moments when you have the platform to speak in front of others is pivotal to your chances of success. This is true for every industry, but for anyone in sales, it’s at the very heart of the experience. Getting on stage in front of a crowd of potential customers, contacts, and influencers is the best way to build a reputation and become a credible, respected authority. But for some, it can be a bearpit where bad first impressions are left ingrained in the minds of unforgiving audiences.

From the folks at PreziRead the rest . . .

6 Ways to Reap the Benefits of Popups Without Annoying Your Readers

Popups are one of the most controversial tactics in the online-marketing arsenal.

On the one hand, readers sometimes find them intrusive. On the other, they are incredibly effective at engaging your audience and building your (incredibly valuable) email list.

From the folks at PippityRead the rest . . .

The Not So Obvious Reason You Should Have a Podcast for Your Business

There are many blog posts out there on why you should podcast. They cover the typical reasons:

  • Brand Building
  • More time in the day for someone to listen to Audio then read a blog or watch a video
  • Higher level of engagement with your customers / audience
  • Conveys a higher level of authority then a simple blog

From the folks at LibsynRead the rest . . .

Recording High-Quality Interviews

callrecord240Online interviews with experts can captivate and inspire. Using Skype and Ecamm Call Recorder makes recording as easy as placing a phone call. With just a few quick steps, and a little practice, conducting an inspiring interview can be just as easy.

Nothing detracts from an interview quite like bad sound quality. Fortunately, it’s easy to achieve professional sound quality with just a few simple steps. Perhaps most important is keeping audio isolated. When recording a call, you’re actually recording two things: your voice, picked up by your microphone, and your guest’s voice, which gets played out of your computer’s speakers. If your microphone picks up sound from the speakers, your guest’s voice may end up getting recorded twice. During playback, this will give the guest’s voice an annoying, unprofessional echo.

From the folks that make Call RecorderRead the rest here . . .

13 How and Why I Podcast

I have produced a weekly podcast for about five years now. It started out as one of my content creation tactics but quickly became an important way to gain access to leading authors and marketing professionals. In fact, I’ve often referred to it as my secret weapon.

I’ve developed a pretty stable following and the show generally ranks in the top twenty on iTunes for the marketing and management category, but I would do it even no one listened because of the doors it has opened.

Podcasting isn’t the red hot trendy topic these days, but it’s still a very solid tool to put in your content bag. Every now and then I get asked what tools I use to produce my show and so I thought I would write a post to spell my routine out.

My shows are all interviews done via a phone line

  • To capture the calls I use SkypeIn line so guests can call from a landline but I capture the call on Skype (Obviously Skype to Skype calls work well too)
  • To record I use a Skype plugin called Call Recorder (Pamela on PC) – this plugin has feature that also allows me to split the tracks so my guest and I are can be edited separately.
  • For my sound I use a Sennheiser USB headset – a little pricey but always a great place to spend your money.
  • To edit the show I use Garage Band on a Mac – you can also use Audacity on a PC
  • I purchased intro music track from iStockphoto
  • To host the show I use Libsyn – I don’t use all of the features from this tool but the hosting and streaming bandwidth is inexpensive
  • I use this WordPress blog to publish my shows so I use Feedburner to make the category feed podcast and iTunes friendly
  • Occasionally I’ll transcribe an episode using Casting Words

You can listen to the show by subscribing the feed in iTunes or a variety of other free services such as Google Listen (Use this RSS feed) or you can buy the Duct Tape Marketing iPhone app. (iTunes link – Cost is $2.99) or Android app and listen to the show as well as about ten past shows on your phone.

23 One way to podcast

John Jantsch podcastA reader and subscriber to the Duct Tape Marketing podcast asked me recently to reveal the tools, techniques and software I use to create, edit and publish my podcast. My system is hacked together through a couple of years of trial and error and is by no means the textbook way to podcast, but like most of what I do it’s simple and practical. So here’s an under the hood look at the Duct Tape Marketing podcast.

Recording

All of my episodes are recorded phone conversations. This presents a real quality challenge as phone lines don’t produce good audio signals. I tested a few solutions and landed on a decidedly low tech approach at the suggestion of a radio station technician.

Using a very retro cool Blue Snowball USB mic and WireTap Studio software I place the guest on speaker mode, lay the mic down by the phone, hit record and conduct the interview. My voice and that of the guest are captured directly into the recording software as an mp3 file. (Audiophiles may be cringing at the sound of this, but it produces decent quality, level sound between my voice and the guest, and eliminates a couple steps in the process.)

Editing

On a Mac I have found that Garage Band does a nice job. (Audacity is a great PC option) In Garage Band I can add the sponsor messages, music clips from a library and edit anything out of the recorded interview. Once I’m happy with the results I export to iTunes and convert back to mp3 format. This seems to produce a nice balance between audio quality and file size.

Publishing

Since mp3 files can get pretty big and benefit from a media server for streaming I use Libsyn to host and stream my files. I get all the bandwidth I need (even with thousands of downloads per episode) for less than $10 per month.

I use a blog created just for the podcast to post show notes and publish the RSS feed. I’m moving this to a WordPress blog eventually and have heard nice things about PodPress for this function.

Promoting

You must make sure that your podcast is listed in iTunes and that people can easily subscribe. I would also suggest seeking out and submitting your feed to a host of podcast directories.

There you have it, my podcasting secrets laid bare. Any other podcasters out there care to share their podcasting success secrets?